Design, plan, and evaluate any solar project in minutes!

  • Simplified
  • Automated
  • Reliable

Plan Commercial Solar Projects

The platform allows users to design, plan, and evaluate future developments of solar farms in minutes. Save significant time and money with LandGate’s Solar PowerVal.

Most Accurate Solar Farm Data

The platform includes conditioned solar farm data, historical production, localized LMPs, local/state incentives, topography, exclusion zones, 3D solar irradiance, location specific capital costs, operating costs, and PPAs for existing and future farms.

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Evaluate Economics

Users can evaluate the economics of future solar farm development and run economics on groups of existing solar farms. Developers have the ability to automatically build new solar farm outlines based on exclusions and setbacks, use the built-in economic parameters or adjust them, print a full economic report and feasibility study in seconds, and run price sensitivities.

 

Engineering Support Included

The platform will save you significant time and money and includes full engineering support. LandGate’s Solar PowerVal simplifies the engineering process by automating the time consuming and challenging parts of economic evaluation, making the process easy for anyone regardless of technical background.

Solar PowerVal Pricing

Monthly Subscription

$900 per user per month

Annual Subscription

$9,000 per user per year

Save 17%

Success Stories

FAQs

Solar PowerVal is the first and only engineering and economics web app for commercial solar farms (potential, existing, under construction, or permitted). LandGate’s Solar PowerVal web app focuses on project economics from start to finish and is the only all-in-one solution on the market. PowerVal pulls complete infrastructure data and provides default parameters which can be adjusted. The software allows for full cash flow analysis on solar farm development in a matter of minutes providing developers light speed answers to site selection.

LandGate’s team of scientists and developers have four large data sources: (1) government and public data from ISO/RTOs or all utility companies in the US, (2) compilation of the most relevant research data, (3) LandGate’s internal data and analytics, and (4) confidential aggregation of user-authorized input data from landowners or average operating costs and capital costs.

Absolutely. The default default data and economic inputs are here to help you run economics in minutes. LandGate’s team of scientists and developers have four large data sources: (1) government and public data from ISO/RTOs or all utility companies in the US, (2) compilation of the most relevant research data, (3) LandGate’s internal data and analytics, and (4) confidential aggregation of user-authorized input data from landowners or average operating costs and capital costs.

The solar infrastructure data is updated as often as the data source updates it. For example, some ISOs update their PNode pricing data every 15 minutes, this is the frequency LandGate updates it live on the web app, or through the API point connections if the user is a PowerDeals subscriber with data download access. Besides PNode data, most of the infrastructure data updates on a monthly basis.

Yes, users can model the engineering and economics of any potential site in the US. The web app will automatically populate with LandGate’s database of infrastructure data, exclusion zones, economic parameters, and energy prices specific to each solar array location to simplify the task for users. Any of these economic inputs can be edited in the web app or in excel to customize the economics.

Yes, users can select existing solar farms with their historical production, as well as solar farms under construction, permitted, and potential solar projects. The economics will aggregate the production, forecast, and economics of all the selected farms.

A user can change the production start date, the capital cost date, and any economic parameter of each solar array within a solar farm.

The economic calculation is very accurate, offering all the economic input parameters that developers normally use, and more. The preloaded economic input parameters from LandGate’s solar infrastructure data and platform can provide a 90% answer in seconds. A user can then easily customize the economic inputs in the web app or in excel, and obtain in minutes the 100% economic results they are seeking.

The monthly 3D solar irradiance in MW is calculated using the monthly 2D Average Solar Irradiation measured in J/m2, the Average Thermal Irradiation measured in J/m2, converted to 2D irradiance in MW, and corrected to the local topography using the solar incidence angle at the given latitude. For example, a tract of land with a downslope facing south at a 40 deg latitude will have an increased 3D solar irradiance compared to the measured 2D solar irradiance.

An irradiance is measuring power, with typical units in MW. An irradiation is measuring energy, with typical units in J/m2. The irradiation is the power over a period of time. Irradiance vs irradiation is similar to comparing the capacity of a solar farm in MW to the energy production of the solar farm in MWh.

A Megawatt (MW) is a million watts (1,000,000 W) or a thousand kilowatts (1,000 kW). A MW is measuring instant power. A Megawatt hour (MWh) is a million watt hours (1,000,000 Wh) or a thousand kilowatt hours (1,000 kWh). A MWh is measuring energy, which is the power over a period of time.
For example a solar farm of 50 MW capacity has an instant maximum power generation of 50 MW. If the solar farm produces for an hour at this max capacity, it will produce 50 MWh of energy.
Solar farm costs are typically related to the capacity of the solar farm, hence the notation is in dollars per MW ($/MW). Solar farm production is reported in megawatt hour (MWh) and the energy prices (or electricity prices) at the PNode, Hub or PPA are in dollars per megawatt hour ($/MWh).

Each solar array is automatically associated with the nearest substation (and can be user adjusted as an economic input parameter). Each substation is in turn associated with a Pricing Node (PNode) and Hub. A user can use the energy pricing from the PNode, from the Hub, from the PPA (for producing farms), or custom.
The local incentives to the energy prices, REC / FIT / PBI / ACP, are also automatically populated based on the location of the solar farm. These energy incentives are constantly updated to provide the most accurate economics. REC stands for Renewable Energy Certificate and is in $/MWh over a term. PBI stands for Performance-Based Incentives and is in $/MWh over a term. FIT stands for Feed-in Tariff and is in $/MWh over a term with a cap. ACP stands for Alternative Compliance Paymentand is in $/MWh over a term.

Yes, the local incentives to the energy prices, REC / FIT / PBI / ACP, are also automatically populated based on the location of the solar farm. These energy incentives are constantly updated to provide the most accurate economics. REC stands for Renewable Energy Certificate and is in $/MWh over a term. PBI stands for Performance-Based Incentives and is in $/MWh over a term. FIT stands for Feed-in Tariff and is in $/MWh over a term with a cap. ACP stands for Alternative Compliance Paymentand is in $/MWh over a term.

In addition to the energy price incentives, SolarPowerval will automatically populate the state level tax incentives: Sales and Use Tax, State Median Property Tax (Ad Valorem), State Sales Tax Exempt Status, Property Tax (Ad Valorem) Exemption Status of the Solar Farm. Any of these incentives can be turned off or edited by the user.
The Federal Solar Investment Tax Credit (Federal ITC) are also automatically applied but can be edited by the user. These Federal level tax incentives are applying a tax writeoff to the capital expenditures, and adding an additional 26% of tax writeoff. This means that a solar developer will (as of 9/28/2021) write off 126% of its capital expenditures. Using a 35% marginal corporate tax rate, the Federal ITC reduces the capital cost by 9.1%.

If a user selects the energy pricing from the Hub, it’s pulling the 24 months of futures of the energy pricing from the Hub, and forecasting the last 12 months of energy pricing change for the life of the project.
If a user selects energy pricing from the PNode for a given solar array, it’s using the Hub futures adjusted to the PNode to forecast the energy pricing of the PNode.

There are no limits to the economic runs. Users can run multiple sensitivity analyses of solar projects in minutes.

LandGate’s developers are ex DoD and user security and confidentiality is our top priority. All user passwords are encrypted and valuations are stored on a secure server only accessible to the user.

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